Wednesday, May 3, 2017

The Angels' Share - Book Review

In making whiskey, the whiskey that evaporates during the aging process is called "The Angels' Share". Giving some to the angels is supposed to protect the distillery.

That's how James Markert's book The Angels' Share got its name. It's a book about whiskey, about family, about Prohibition and the Great Depression, and about miracles.

Prohibition has ended but William McFee's father has yet to revive the family whiskey business and the morale of the town. While his father is busy burying his pain in drink, his mother is flirting with another man, and his brother is getting into trouble with the law. Everyone in the family is mourning the death of the youngest sibling, Henry.

However, when a stranger is buried in the cemetery next to the distillery, it attracts quite a crowd. Not just 12 "apostles" who claim that the buried man is Jesus Christ but a flock of others who seek to pray at the grave in hopes of experiencing a miracle.

And miracles do happen. Ones that William and his family can't explain. But is the deceased drifter really Jesus?

I really liked the historical aspect of the book. The author has a history degree and definitely put his knowledge of the time period to use. The story itself was pretty good, too, and not anything like what I expected. I wouldn't really classify it as a Christian novel. Rather, it's historical fiction with elements of Christianity in it. It's an interesting look at what would happen if Jesus was reborn into the 20th century and begs readers to ask themselves what they would do.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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